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CSPAN2 8
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 5:30pm PDT
over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and...
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 12:00am PDT
and the u.s. steel and so forth. the civil rights movement put pressure on washington to open up the american dream to blacks and other minorities. part of what happened to them was it was so successful. but part of what happened to them was there was a power shift. there was a tremendous change of power in washington, and that had big effect on the ability of middle class americans to achieve the american dream. the other thing that happened is what i call wedge economics. the splitting of the american middle class off from the games of the national economy. so that today you can see the economy improving bit by bit by middle class people aren't doing that much better. people at the top are doing real well. corporations are reporting profits, but the people in the middle aren't doing that well. back in the old days tbhak the heyday of the middle class, everybody sharedded in that prosperity. today everybody doesn't share in that prosperity. that's why so many people feel so much pain. >> suarez: you take us again and again in the book to key moments where things could have gone
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00am EDT
important novel for african-americans to articulate civil rights. it exhibited an enormous influence not just and other writers but on leaving political figures and social activists. so without "uncle tom's cabin" you rich without strong, written very much to model. he wanted to model his work during the reconstruction era after "uncle tom's cabin." james baldwin famously in 1955 publishers the screen against "uncle tom's cabin." but for him, too, in the 1950s he says no novel has ever exerted over him like the power of "uncle tom's cabin." it's the sentimental power of this novel that last very much to the present day. >> watch booktv all weekend to see more of our recent visit to augusta, maine. for more information on this and other cities visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> antonio mendez presents his book, "argo," at the international spy museum in d.c. arco details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia off
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 5:00pm EDT
strong. right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s. army was. during the civil war the army expanded to. 3-million people. 2 and a half people or so in the north. and this meant that the amount of case work that he had to oversee was extraordinary and he also was given responsibility for pursuing civilians who were engaged in disloyal acts. treason behavior and so on. he didn't pursue every case. he didn't serve on every case himself. obviously a lot of court marshall went on the field. it was his responsibility to make sure that justice was -- as much as he could that justice was prevailing in the cases and punishment was being weeded out as it should be and people's rights were being protected. it was a massive assignment that went way past the end of the war. he stayed in the position until 1875 pfs it a expanded position. he had the role in that that position of making law. so much law about war didn't even exist because this was a war the likes of which the the united states had never see. so many, many policy around how the war should be conducted and it needed to be c
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00pm EDT
is right outside the door here, and you'll be staying for signing. >> i will. and as a civil servant of the government, i don't receive any royalties, so the price has been set very low, and i hope you all enjoy it. [laughter] >> let's talk a little bit about the idea that these machines have proceeded us to mars. is it still, ultimately, the target to put a human being there? >> for sure. and it's sometimes very surprising if you talk -- all of the scientists i spoke to really want to be there. they, they sense that they need to be there in order to do exploration the way it should be done. and part of it has to do with all those limitations that i talked about. they all want to go in different places. we'd accomplish a lot more with six people than six people standing on a skateboard together. and i think your point, though, about anticipating or preparing has become more and more real. i don't think we understood that so well before mer. that we could for reasonable cost put these rovers in different places around mars and figure out where would we want to go, where should we land
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 12:00pm EDT
important. the most important civil right is voting. it's with everything else relies on, and the disenfranchisement isn't a casual thing even if it doesn't turn and the election if somebody can't vote in a state that is solid blue or solid red that is also because that person hasn't been able to participate with it changes the outcome, but i think that with the nfl rapid which did get that strike or lockout rather did get settled very quickly after every book on the national television saw the game that went the wrong way, and tragically at me make something like that for the voter i.d. and suppression to get not only the media attention but the judicial attention that it deserves. >> i want you to join in here. so, it from the data perspective the voter suppression is extremely small. i have no idea what the right percentage should be but it is under 1% and another one of the topics that is just way down that we believe should be more a part of the coverage is the money in politics, so the fund raising is just a sliver of the percentage. one of the things we are trying
CNN
Oct 9, 2012 9:00am PDT
an ally. >>> 28 days to go until the election and we're looking in depth at voters in america. some civil rights activists are concerned about new voter i.d. laws. 31 states currently have voter i.d. laws in place. tennessee has one of the strictest. and former marine tim thompson is angry. >> hi. i'm tim thompson. i'm 56 years old. i'm a former united states marine. and i live here in nashville, tennessee. i'm against federal i.d. the way it is written right now. and we knew super tuesday was coming up, big scene, an i decided i needed to do something. i want to go down to the polling place and show my registration card like i've done for 37 years and see what they say to me. and, of course, they didn't allow me to vote. but then i told the polling director that i refuse to show you i.d. because i'm protesting the law. i'm giving up my right to vote today to fight for the rights of people that don't have this opportunity that want to vote but don't have the opportunity because they might not have that i.d. so the only weapon that an individual has in this country is his right to vote. an
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 7:00am EDT
in passing the great society legislation, civil rights, the big ticket items and a note earlier era. there is an argument about steady leadership that could pave the way. on the flip side, this is the most partisan, divided congress in 100 years, and that does not count for nothing. that plays a huge role. it also feeds into the frustration people have with congress -- why can they not get this deal done? we know it needs to happen. it is a growing problem. like so many things, policy- wise, it is difficult, if not impossible, and politically lawmakers tend to not want to do with it in until they're faced with all last possible moment to act because if they at earlier, they will certainly be criticized -- why did you make the deal this way or that way? both sides will be criticized. as we saw last summer during the standoff over raising the nation's debt ceiling, it went down to the last possible minute because neither side was willing to stick their necks out and say they would do something. that might not be the profile in courage that people expect from their lawmaker, but it is
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 11:00pm EDT
marriage equality, i think it is constitutionally guaranteed with the civil-rights of the '60s. >> host: john is the independent. >> caller: mr. johnson mr. johnson, the only problem i have is about the tax issue. our taxes have never been set up to be fair. originally for the rich to pay them majority of taxes in federal taxes and a working class or poor would pay the majority of there's of homeowners gomez city, and state taxes. my problem with a fair tax is we're on a fixed income. the states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government has such a low were one. if someone buys a refrigerator at $700 there will be the $100 tax. that is the problem. the only when it will hurt are the people that are retired, disability, and the things like that. otherwise i am in completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul. i voted for paul brown. i cannot remember what year he ran. i voted for ross perot once. i am very open-minded better watch things closely. >> host: thank you for calling. gary johnson and the reaction? >> guest: by going to a national consumption tax
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 2:00am EDT
and i think they succeeded really well. see our next question comes from steven right here in civil -- silver springs maryland in the suburbs. high steven. >> caller: i would like to ask particularly david and julie, someone who is writing his own book on president nixon, i would be very interested to find out what if any advice president eisenhower they have given to president nixon on an informal basis about how to conduct the war in vietnam? >> we talk about it quite extensively in "going home to glory," we discovered an effective cover that in a certain way and i think it was, what happens in late 1967 and attackers is wonderful account the richard nixon wrote that was basically his last business meeting with dwight eisenhower. and what i see here is that by eisenhower was somebody who knew two things and first of all in his era he knew the nature of the soviet communism and he knew america's important than sort of holding up and defending the free world but he also knew that his perspective and his wisdom was generation bound and that the next generation and nixon represented t
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 12:00pm EDT
administration's benign neglect of the poor and studied indifference to civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week in overton who seem toe think the best thing about george bush is he not ronald reagan. >>> largely as a result of the policies and priorities of the reagan administration more people are becoming poor and staying poor in this country than anytime since world war ii. ♪ . >> if there is thinking left to ronald reagan's trickle down theory, done, it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickng down through just about every segment of our society. ♪ . >> if you gave clarence thomas a little flower on his face you would think you had david duke talking. here is a man who, is against everything that has lifted the level of life of millions of blacks. ♪ . >> i hope his wife feeds him lots of eggs and butter and dies like many black men do of heart disease. that is how i feel. he is absolutely reprehensible person. ♪ . >> you've called gingrich and his ilk, your words, trickle down terrorists who base their agenda on exclusion, and fear. do you think middle class a
NBC
Oct 4, 2012 7:00am EDT
what mitt did to me. it also warns that romney will end bert and ernie's right to a civil union. the debate was the most tweeted about event in u.s. political history. >>> former saved by the bell star is suffering from bipolar disorder. "people" interviewed the women after lark's appearance on tv last spring had fans wondering about her drastic new look. "people" said she did talk about voices in her head and explained long pauses in her answers as moments of prayer. >>> and a cleveland school bus driver was fed up with one woman he said repeatedly drove on the sidewalk to go on his bus when he stopped to pick up a disabled child. so he had police set up a sting. >> all right. justice has been served. >> well, the driver pleaded not guilty tuesday to reckless operation and failing to stop for a school bus. that will teach him. it's 8:06. let's go over to al with a check of your weather. >> guess he doesn't know about the video. >> i guess not. >> thanks, nat. let's see what we've got for you as far as today's weather is er isrned. concerned. the pick city of the day is laredo,
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:45am EDT
and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civilization a rise and began to make use of those harbors and rivers they were obvious so help us think about why it's the geography we spoke upon based to the cultural with the supposition one aspect. >> phyllis do ha and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the development of technology will let shortened the distance it did not negate geography. it needed more precious and important as it opened up a new geography to the world conflict system and world trade system. culture and economics and people flow from the geography because what is culture? the accumulated experience of people on the landscape over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to the traditions and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i have the a identifiable culture is remaining. nobody can mistake that there is a remaining culture that's been formed by the conflict between the inva
CNN
Oct 8, 2012 9:00am PDT
is right for you. [ doctor ] enbrel, the number one biolog medicine prescribed by rheumatologists. >>> more fears that syria's civil war will escalate into a regional fight. for the fifth day in a row syrian army forces are exchanging fire with turkish troops on the border, and in northern syria here's what's happening. syrian troops, they are pushing to retake the key cities of homs and aleppo. opposition activists say at least 76 people have died across syria so far today. this is the suburb of aleppo in northern syria. the person who posted this video on youtube says it shows regime war planes attacking buses there and killing civilians. cnn has no way to independently verify the video. >>> well, empowerment. as children it wasn't a feeling that stella paul or humming bird knew. they didn't know it well at all. they learned find power from within. they broke free from lives of abuse and repression, and now through their work with world pulse and the power of social media they are teaching other women how to do the same. cnn is proud to support world pulse whose mission is to connect wome
LINKTV
Oct 3, 2012 6:00pm PDT
of those times when you go on a vacation, to be right where lincoln had been and so-and-so. >> you're so right. >> ...just religion of jesus christ or such. >> that's the feeling you get, and we'll talk about this in terms of civil religion - kind of a controversial term - but that's exactly why we want to go back to those original spots, go back to colonial times, because you're reliving the mythic drama. did you notice, oh, last year or something like that, the mormons got together, dressed in their old - the 19th century clothing, and they got the oxen and everything, and they did redid the mormon trail out to utah. they want to relive it - it renews the experience. yes. >> it seems to me, from everything we've discussed, that the danger in most religions, in my perspective, seems to come when the learning of the myths is taken in without understanding the symbolism there, and without historical perspective. >> yes. absolutely. this is a point that i want to extend on when we get to doctrine, but i teach the bible sequence down at western illinois university, and naturally, i have the
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)